Loan Value – Regiofora http://regiofora.com/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 15:17:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://regiofora.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-5-150x150.png Loan Value – Regiofora http://regiofora.com/ 32 32 Suncor Energy (SU) is one of the highest ranked growth stocks: should you buy? https://regiofora.com/suncor-energy-su-is-one-of-the-highest-ranked-growth-stocks-should-you-buy/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 15:17:11 +0000 https://regiofora.com/suncor-energy-su-is-one-of-the-highest-ranked-growth-stocks-should-you-buy/ For new and old investors, taking full advantage of the stock market and investing with confidence are common goals. Zacks Premium offers plenty of ways to do both. The popular research service can help you become a smarter and safer investor, giving you access to daily updates in the Zacks ranking and the Zacks Industry […]]]>

For new and old investors, taking full advantage of the stock market and investing with confidence are common goals. Zacks Premium offers plenty of ways to do both.

The popular research service can help you become a smarter and safer investor, giving you access to daily updates in the Zacks ranking and the Zacks Industry ranking, the Zacks #1 classification list, reports stock research and premium stock screens.

It also includes access to Zacks style sheet music.

What are Zacks style scores?

The Zacks style scores, developed in parallel with the Zacks classification, are complementary indicators that assess actions according to three widely followed investment methodologies; They also help investors choose stocks with the best chance of beating the market over the next 30 days.

On the basis of their characteristics of value, growth and momentum, each action is assigned a note of A, B, C, D or F. The more good the score, the best are the chances that the action outperform; an A is better than a B, a B is better than a C, etc.

Style Scores are divided into four categories:

Value Rating

For value -oriented investors, it is a question of finding good deeds at good prices and discovering which companies are negotiated at their fair value before the market spreads. The value -style score uses ratios such as P/E, PEG, Price/Sales, Price/Cash flows and a host of other multiple to help select the most attractive and access actions.

Growth Score

Investors focused on growth are more concerned with the future prospects of an action, as well as by the overall health and financial solidity of a company. Thus, the Growth Style Score analyzes characteristics such as expected and historical earnings, sales and cash flow to find stocks that will experience sustainable growth over time.

Momentum Score

Aggressive investors, who live by the saying “the trend is your friend”, are more interested in taking advantage of rising or falling trends in a stock’s price or earnings prospects. Using the variation of prices over a week and the monthly variation as a percentage of profits, among other factors, the STORY STYLE MOMENTUM can help determine the favorable moments to buy high dynamic actions.

VGM score

If you enjoy using all three types of investing, the VGM score is for you. It’s a combination of all style scores, and it’s an important indicator to use with the Zacks rank. The VGM score rates each stock based on its shared weighted styles, narrowing down the companies with the most attractive value, the best growth forecasts and the most promising momentum.

How Style Scores Work with Zacks Ranking

The ZABKS ranking is an exclusive model for the rating of actions which exploits the power of revisions of the estimates of profits or changes in the forecasts of a company’s profits to help investors build a powerful portfolio.

It is a great success, with actions #1 (Strong buy) producing an unrivaled average annual return of +25.41% since 1988. It is more than double the S&P 500. But due to the large number of shares that we assess, there are over 200 companies with a strong Buy Rank, plus another 600 with a #2 (Buy) Rank, on any given day.

That totals over 800 top-rated stocks, and it can be overwhelming trying to choose the best stocks for you and your portfolio.

This is where Style Scores come in.

You want to make sure you’re buying stocks with the highest probability of success, and to do that you’ll need to choose stocks with a Zacks #1 or #2 rating that also have A or B style scores. you like a security that is only ranked #3 (Hold), it should also have scores of A or B to ensure as much upside potential as possible.

The direction of a stock’s earnings estimate revisions should always be a key factor when deciding which stocks to buy, since the scores were created to work with the Zacks Ranking.

For example, an action with a note #4 (sale) or #5 (strong sale), even one that displays scores of A and B, always has a lower profits, and a much greater probability than its share price drops. as well.

So the more stocks you have with a rank of #1 or #2 and scores of A or B, the better.

Stock to watch: Suncor Energy (SU)

Founded in 1917, Alberta-based Suncor Energy, Inc. is Canada’s first integrated energy company. The Company’s activities include oil sands development and upgrading, conventional and offshore crude oil and gas production, petroleum refining and product marketing. Suncor is one of the largest oil sands owners in the world. The company has acquired new oil sands properties to complement its existing operations in northern Alberta, making it the dominant producer in the region where reserves are second only to Saudi Arabia.

SU is a #1 (strong buy) on the Zacks rank, with a VGM score of A.

Additionally, the company could be a top pick for growth investors. SU has a growth style score of A, forecasting year-over-year earnings growth of 191.2% for the current fiscal year.

For the year 2022, three analysts have revised their profits to the last 60 days, and the estimate of Zacks consensus increased from $ 2 to $ 5.94 per share. SU shows an average earnings surprise of 3.6%.

With strong Ranks and high level growth and VGM style scores, SU should be on the shortlist of investors.

Click to get this free report

Suncor Energy Inc. (SU): Free Stock Analysis Report

To read this article on Zacks.com, click here.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

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Crypto Whale’s $181 Million Ether Bet Goes Badly Badly https://regiofora.com/crypto-whales-181-million-ether-bet-goes-badly-badly/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 17:46:12 +0000 https://regiofora.com/crypto-whales-181-million-ether-bet-goes-badly-badly/ This is how the markets loosen up and with blockchains, savvy users can all watch it live as it goes down. Over the past few days, crypto watchers have been captivated by two large wallets that appear to be linked, which hold $181 million in ether (ETH). They also have guarantees in the form of […]]]>

This is how the markets loosen up and with blockchains, savvy users can all watch it live as it goes down.

Over the past few days, crypto watchers have been captivated by two large wallets that appear to be linked, which hold $181 million in ether (ETH). They also have guarantees in the form of loans that are at the limit of solvency.

  • Most of the debt is in the Aave money market (152,098.98 ETH worth $166 million at the time of writing, but the rest is in Compound (14,316.90 ETH worth $15, $6 million).

Why is this important: If the price of Ether drops further, these debts will be liquidated, releasing a flood of Ether into the market, which will further lower the price of Ether.

Driving the news: Crypto’s winter is turning increasingly frosty, with Bitcoin falling below the psychologically charged $20,000 level early on Saturday, and Ether briefly dipping below $1,000 as investors bail out digital coins. Both have lost more than 30% of their value in the past week alone.

With a whale in a dangerous place position like this, traders who believe ether will return to previous highs long-term now have an incentive to sell. If it drops enough, large loans like these will be liquidated and drive the price down even further.

  • This could be their signal to buy again, increasing their total ETH holdings for free, but only after market aspirations have taken a serious hit.
  • Meanwhile, liquidations are currently increasing at decentralized financial lenders, with $250.6 million in liquidations across Aave, Compound and MakerDAO in the last 7 days, according to Dune Analytics.
A trading account with 165,000 followers noting the precarious position of 0x493F. Screenshot: @lightcrypto (Twitter)

Details: The wallets in question are 0x493F and 0x7160. For the first wallet, scroll down to Aave v2 and see the largest loan.

  • These wallets appear to be linked, as they can be seen making larger ether transfers from the first to the second here and here, before completing the compound loan collateral.

We could naturally ask ourselves: Why not just close the loans? They can’t, because wallets are long leveraged. The owner deposited ETH, borrowed stablecoins, bought more ETH and deposited that to borrow more stablecoins to start over. Etc.

  • ZoomerAnon from the team at DeFi analytics firm Uniwhales, explained that you can see the wallet repeatedly taking stablecoins like USDT and USDC, sending it to Binance, and withdrawing thousands of ethers.
  • In early January, several transactions like this could be observed using Etherscan.

Be smart: Traders leverage when they believe the price of an asset will rise. If so, they can withdraw enough to pay off their loan, withdraw their collateral, and exit the trade with more of the underlying asset.

Yes, but: This only works if the price of the asset rises.

  • These wallets were betting that Ether would rise further in January, when it was trading above $3,300. Today, he barely has $1,000.
  • “He borrowed 96,040 ETH before borrowing money,” ZoomerAnon told Axios via Telegram.

DeFi lenders are automated. They monitor collateral prices to ensure that each loan is properly secured. As soon as the collateral becomes insufficient, these protocols automatically sell the underlying collateral on the open market.

  • Every time a borrower is liquidated, he gets a painful haircut. When they have leveraged their position, this haircut is multiplied.

By the numbers: A researcher calculated that the largest position, on Aave, will be liquidated at the price of 982 ETH. Uniwhales puts its liquidation price at $870.

  • ETH would need to drop $212, or almost 20%, to trigger this price drop. That said, ETH has lost $212 in value since June 13 and nearly $900 since June 1.

The plot: These positions are assumed to be owned by a major Chinese contractor, but he could operate on his own, without the sophisticated risk modeling of trading companies and the ability to monitor positions around the clock.

  • That said, if the owner has liquid capital, they can always buy stablecoins and close some of the dead positions, thus avoiding liquidation.

Thought bubble: It may look like another giant disaster coming to the crypto world, but there’s another way to look at it: as a transparent market, working as intended.

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Governor DeSantis’ net worth declined in 2021 https://regiofora.com/governor-desantis-net-worth-declined-in-2021/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 22:03:38 +0000 https://regiofora.com/governor-desantis-net-worth-declined-in-2021/ TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Ron DeSantis’ net worth has fallen just over 8.5% in his third year as state chief executive. Listing the $134,181 he earned as governor as his only income, DeSantis reported a net worth of $318,987 as of December 31. DeSantis filed the financial disclosure last week with the state Division of Elections […]]]>

TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Ron DeSantis’ net worth has fallen just over 8.5% in his third year as state chief executive.

Listing the $134,181 he earned as governor as his only income, DeSantis reported a net worth of $318,987 as of December 31. DeSantis filed the financial disclosure last week with the state Division of Elections as part of the re-election campaign materials.

Last year, DeSantis reported a net worth of $348,832 as of December 31, 2020. That was up from $291,449 at the end of 2019.

Related: Governor Ron DeSantis posts increase in his net worth

State candidates and elected officials are required to file annual disclosure reports that typically detail their finances as of the end of the previous year.

The forms require disclosure of estimated net worth, assets valued over $1,000, liabilities over $1,000, and income information.

DeSantis listed assets at the end of 2021 of $202,980 in USAA checking and savings accounts; $89,066 in a savings plan, a type of retirement savings and investment plan; and $48,226 in Florida’s retirement system.

The Florida Retirement System account increased by $17,923 from the previous year, while the USAA total fell by $32,020 and the savings plan decreased by $16,689.

DeSantis also continued to repay a Sallie Mae student loan in 2021, with the balance dropping from $22,225 at the end of 2020 to $21,285 as of December 31.

DeSantis, who lives in the governor’s mansion and hasn’t listed any real estate, sold his Ponte Vedra Beach home in March 2019 for $460,000, according to St. Johns County property records.

When DeSantis ran for governor, his reported net worth for 2017 was $310,971. It fell to $283,605 the following year.

Related: Why doesn’t the Florida legislature look like the Florida workforce?

Charlie Crist net worth of $2 million

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Charlie Crist, a congressman from St. Petersburg, posted a net worth of $1.956 million as of December 31.

When Crist last ran for a statewide position in 2014, his net worth stood at $1.25 million.

In a disclosure report filed Monday, Crist listed just over $2 million in investments and cash in bank accounts, as well as a 25-foot Trophy Fisherman Center Console boat with a value of $45,000.

Crist said income from Congress was $174,000, $57,493 from the Florida Division of Retirement and just over $50,000 from investments.

His only liability in 2021 was $35,000 for a rental property in St. Petersburg.

Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried, who is competing with Crist for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, had not filed a new disclosure report early Tuesday afternoon.

Reports from Republican State Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis and Republican Attorney General Ashley Moody, both up for re-election, had also not been posted on the Division of Elections website.

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Wilton Simpson’s net worth plummets

Senate Speaker Wilton Simpson, a Republican from Trilby running for agriculture commissioner, filed a statement showing a net worth of $22.5 million as of December 31, down nearly 28.6% compared to the previous year.

Simpson has seen his net worth plummet more than 32% since becoming Senate President in 2020.

In the new report, Simpson listed assets including Simpson Farms in Trilby worth $10.934 million. He also listed a third-party stake in the limited company Belly Wadding as being valued at $592,179. Belly Wadding’s main source of income is listed as NOSNAWS Corp., which owns IHOP restaurants in Florida.

Simpson’s money market accounts and other intangibles fell from $6.9 million in 2020 to just under $6.3 million at the end of 2021.

In addition to the $39,021 in state revenue, Simpson said he withdrew $1.65 million from Simpson Farms. $1.25 million from environmental security firm SES Hold Co. and $22,058 from Belly Wadding.

Simpson’s home is valued at $602,073, while a Plaza Tower condominium in Tallahassee has an appraised value of $270,870.

By Jim Turner, News Service of Florida

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Why should we talk about free tuition (review) https://regiofora.com/why-should-we-talk-about-free-tuition-review/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 07:10:36 +0000 https://regiofora.com/why-should-we-talk-about-free-tuition-review/ New Mexico Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham triumphantly signed Senate Bill 140 into law earlier this spring. Also known as the New Mexico Opportunity Scholarship Act, SB 140 removes tuition fees as a barrier for New Mexican students attending public institutions of higher learning in the state. Essentially, any New Mexican student attending a tribal or […]]]>

New Mexico Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham triumphantly signed Senate Bill 140 into law earlier this spring. Also known as the New Mexico Opportunity Scholarship Act, SB 140 removes tuition fees as a barrier for New Mexican students attending public institutions of higher learning in the state. Essentially, any New Mexican student attending a tribal or state public institution can have their tuition waived if they meet minimum credit hour and grade point average requirements. Although, to varying degrees, other states such as California, North Carolina and Texas have made headlines for considering and enacting tuition waivers for certain groups of students, the law of New Mexico offers students a pathway unmatched by those in other states.

While it may be tempting to view the new landscape of public higher education in New Mexico as a singular case of alignment between political will and adequate resources, we believe these developments resonate with continued attention to the cancellation of student debt and should spur a larger, national, forward-looking conversation about free access to higher education. To endorse specific areas of interest in this conversation, we draw on our ongoing lines of research to examine some compelling reasons why other states should seek similar outcomes in tuition-free higher education.

Consider knowledge

First, the prohibitive cost of tuition and existing income-contingent loan systems combine to commit what might be called structural contributory injustice when these policies or other structures undermine an individual’s ability to participate in and shape the production of knowledge in a given learning community.

Think of it this way: every day, individuals use a body of knowledge and understandings learned from others to navigate the world. While everyone navigates the world with the knowledge they have learned from those around them, privileged listeners often reject or ignore knowledge gleaned from those with experiences on the fringes of a society, furthering the place their own biased knowledge sets. In such cases, the marginalized speaker experiences what philosopher Kristie Dotson calls contributory injustice, or a violation of the speaker’s ability to participate in creating and sharing knowledge resources with others.

But the case identified by Dotson exists not only at the individual level, but also as a structural problem. In this case, prohibitive tuition fees and income-contingent loans similarly undermine the ability of marginalized students to participate in (and share their knowledge resources with) campus learning communities. This injustice occurs in ways that compound existing oppression across multiple dimensions of identity, but for now we will highlight one of the most obvious and egregious forms: the harm to students and black families. In the short term, these barriers place a significant financial burden on Black students through indebtedness, limiting who tends to access post-secondary education and how they participate. A 2018 report from Georgetown University’s Center on Education and Workforce notes that “black and Latino students are only about half as likely as whites to earn a bachelor’s degree.” And those who enroll incur predatory debt that endures and shapes economic decisions throughout adulthood.

In the long term, the impact of these policies on student diversity leads to an impact on faculty diversity. In 2018, three out of four full-time faculty nationwide were white, contributing to systems and interactions of epistemic exclusion within the academy, or the persistent devaluation and rejection of faculty research. of color. If higher education is a valued knowledge-creating institution for a more accurate understanding of our common world and the creation of knowledge resources to function better within it, our nation should address these troubling patterns. For these reasons, tuition-free higher education initiatives should be discussed as a potential remedy for persistent, structural and knowledge-based gaps.

Consider democracy

In addition to the knowledge-based considerations above, news of New Mexico’s law allowing tuition-free public higher education should also call attention to the democratic reasons for similar bills in other countries. states. We offer three invitations to productive deliberation.

First, we encourage a public conversation about the notion that access to higher education is a meaningful resource for navigating an increasingly complex civic environment. To be clear, we are not claiming that access to higher education is a necessary prerequisite for civic participation or that the quality of a person’s civic participation is determined by their level of education. Instead, we want to note that higher education is often seen as providing useful resources for how citizens present themselves for their civic work together. To the extent that this is true, even if only slightly or marginally, prohibitive tuition fees represent an obstacle to a public form of civic preparation in our democracy.

Second, we believe that the national conversation about prohibitive tuition fees should consider what is sometimes called the “expressive” value of these policies. That is, what does a particular tuition policy say about the people it affects? What values ​​or priorities are communicated to the population? Who, according to the priorities of our State, is worthy of being educated by our public resources? If the answer to that last question could plausibly be “those who can afford it,” states might have reason to reconsider their views and commitments to their citizens. Arguably, our democracy should communicate the worth and worth of these people within it, regardless of their financial resources. In a statement on SB 140, Lujan Grisham captures the essence of it, noting that “signing this legislation sends a clear message to New Mexicans that we believe in them and the contributions they will make to their families and society. future of our great state.”

Third, we note that pursuing higher education without tuition fees is a matter of democracy as there is an increasingly clear mandate from citizens. A recent poll shows that about two-thirds of American adults favor tuition-free higher education. Opposition to tuition-free higher education tends to be concentrated primarily (but not exclusively) among those who are relatively well off financially. The wishes of a relatively small and privileged group should not continue to limit access to higher education for a growing segment of their civic peers. As one of us argued in a section of a recently published book, Ethics in higher education (Harvard University Press, 2021), when faced with the choice to advance free public higher education, the democratic will of the people, including those most affected, should guide action.

Looking forward

Clarifying the moral issues of these political structures – considering the impacts on our democratic and shared knowledge production systems as well as the real and significant consequences for individuals – serves to highlight the need for widespread access to post-secondary education. . The policy options available to us are not perfect and will not fully achieve the degrees of access that justice might require. While we have many reasons to be excited that the SB 140 is widely available to New Mexico residents, it is only funded for one year and additional funding would be required for a true system. tuition-free higher education. Yet to date, as many sociologists and economists have argued, the approaches of free public college and student debt cancellation appear to be the available policy options that best advance the moral goals outlined here. -above. As members of institutions of higher education, we each have a role to play – amid the hard work of many other community organizers and political actors – to advocate for access and pursue opportunities to create campuses that are truly open to all.

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Capped Student Loan Interest Rates https://regiofora.com/capped-student-loan-interest-rates/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 23:22:17 +0000 https://regiofora.com/capped-student-loan-interest-rates/ The government will cap student loan interest rates for current graduates to protect them against rising inflation. A rise in the RPI rate due to global economic pressures meant student borrowers faced a 12% interest rate in September and the government stepped in and capped interest rates at a maximum of 7.3 % to protect […]]]>

The government will cap student loan interest rates for current graduates to protect them against rising inflation.

A rise in the RPI rate due to global economic pressures meant student borrowers faced a 12% interest rate in September and the government stepped in and capped interest rates at a maximum of 7.3 % to protect graduates.

The government will seize every opportunity to protect the public against the rising cost of living and global economic pressures. Confirmation of interest rates is usually made in August, but the government has taken unprecedented steps to move the decision forward, based on expected rates, to reassure student borrowers about Plan 2 loans (undergraduate ) and plan 3 (third cycle).

This is the biggest reduction in student loan interest rates on record and will mean, for example, that a borrower with a student loan balance of £45,000 will reduce their accrued interest by around £180. per month, against 12% interest rate. It is on the total value of the loan, as the monthly repayments do not change.

Higher and Further Education Minister Michelle Donelan said:

The government has always been clear that where it can help drive up prices we will, and I will always strive to get a fair deal for students, which is why we have reduced the rate interest on student loans from the expected 12%.

I want to reassure that this does not change the monthly repayment amount for borrowers, and we have brought this announcement forward to provide more clarity and peace of mind for graduates at this time.

For those starting higher education in September 2023 and all students considering this next step at the moment, we have reduced future interest rates so that no new graduate will ever have to repay more than what he borrowed in real terms.

Monthly student loan repayments are based on income rather than interest rates or the amount borrowed. Unlike commercial loans, repayments will stop for all borrowers who earn below the relevant repayment threshold.

For future borrowers, student funding will be put on a more sustainable footing. As announced in February, interest rates will be reduced so that from 2023/24 new graduates do not repay, in real terms, more than they borrow. Along with broader higher education reforms, this will help ensure that students from all backgrounds can continue to receive the highest quality education from our world-leading higher education sector.

This comes with a package of support measures worth £37billion to help those facing rising costs of living, including £400 for all households on their energy bills , targeted support to vulnerable households for costs including food and energy, and changes to Universal Credit, National Living Wage and National Insurance thresholds, so people keep more of what that they win.

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ESMA highlights concerns over ETF securities lending fee practices https://regiofora.com/esma-highlights-concerns-over-etf-securities-lending-fee-practices/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 05:35:24 +0000 https://regiofora.com/esma-highlights-concerns-over-etf-securities-lending-fee-practices/ Industry body ordered further investigation into cost-sharing agreements The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has highlighted several concerns regarding ETF securities lending fee practices, including the allocation of fees and revenues between asset managers and securities lending agents, according to a new report. The report titled, 2021 Joint Supervisory Action (CSA) Final Report on […]]]>

Industry body ordered further investigation into cost-sharing agreements

The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has highlighted several concerns regarding ETF securities lending fee practices, including the allocation of fees and revenues between asset managers and securities lending agents, according to a new report.

The report titled, 2021 Joint Supervisory Action (CSA) Final Report on Costs and Feesfound that securities lending agents – those who facilitate the lending transaction – working on fixed fees retain between 10 and 50% of the gross revenue generated by the transaction, with the rest going to the UCITS fund.

Of this amount, according to ESMA, only 50-65% of the gross revenue was passed on to the end investor by the asset manager, with retail investors getting a particularly gross supply.

“This [return] is consistent with the findings of the Better Finance research paper which indicated wide discrepancy regarding the percentage of revenue passed on to investors and questioned the reasons for this,” the report states.

“In this context, some National Constituent Authorities (NCAs) have expressed the view that it would be useful to clarify ESMA’s guidance on ETFs and other UCITS issues in order to ensure a greater level of prudential convergence on the issue of cost allocation.”

Securities lending, a long-standing practice on ETFs or mutual fund investment vehicles, involves lending stocks or bonds to seek incremental increases in shareholder returns. One of the main attractions for many people considering securities lending is the ability to offset the impact of fees, even if issuers take significant fees from securities lending revenue.

ETFs currently represent only a fraction of all securities lending – 2.6% of the total value – but their share has fallen from a 1.8% stake since 2017. ETF securities lending has nearly doubled between 2017 and mid-2021, according to data from EquiLend, with ETF loan value rising 76.9%, from $37.5 million to $66.3 million.

However, the “fixed” nature of fee agreements could result in “overcharging” investors, ESMA found, as it does not reflect market conditions and prices, meaning services “remain at a level consistently high, despite competitors offering the same services”. with a similar level of quality and at a better price”.

In addition, ESMA also found that the managers did not provide a documented assessment to justify the costs deducted from the gross income, despite asserting it.

“Furthermore, UCITS managers who have reviewed their securities lending structures have often not made a clear distinction between indirect and direct costs,” he added.

Asset managers have also been accused of providing a ‘lack of detailed information’ on lending practices, particularly in areas such as risk, conflict of interest, impact on UCITS fund performance and cost/revenue distribution.

“Another issue mentioned by ANCs is the use of generic language by UCITS managers about what efficient portfolio management (EPM) techniques they use and why,” he said. . “Instead, NCAs observed many instances where the same information was used across the entire fund range of UCITS managers or even the group without sufficient consideration of the specifics of the individual fund and the EPM agreement.”

ESMA concluded: “In light of the divergent market practices and the doubts expressed by some NCAs, ESMA is of the opinion that the issue of the cost allocation arrangement merits further investigation and analysis. “

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Hundreds Reveal Their Biggest Money Regrets As Reserve Bank Hikes Interest Rates https://regiofora.com/hundreds-reveal-their-biggest-money-regrets-as-reserve-bank-hikes-interest-rates/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 15:41:28 +0000 https://regiofora.com/hundreds-reveal-their-biggest-money-regrets-as-reserve-bank-hikes-interest-rates/ Hundreds of Australians have revealed their biggest regrets when it comes to money as inflation soars and interest rates rise by a record 0.5%. From taking out personal loans with an ex-partner to backing low-yielding investments and being too scared to ask for a raise, the men and women detailed exactly where they went wrong […]]]>

Hundreds of Australians have revealed their biggest regrets when it comes to money as inflation soars and interest rates rise by a record 0.5%.

From taking out personal loans with an ex-partner to backing low-yielding investments and being too scared to ask for a raise, the men and women detailed exactly where they went wrong with their finances.

By posting on the My Millennial Money Facebook page, everyone took the opportunity to detail their mistakes and give advice on how to avoid them.

Hundreds of young Australians have revealed their biggest money regrets as Reserve Bank hikes cash rate by 0.5%

A woman has revealed she got cold feet and gave up on buying a Gold Coast flat in 2021 despite having the security deposit and a steady income.

“The apartment has gone up in value by $200,000. It hurts. At least I own a house, I guess. It could be worse,” she wrote.

Another man regretted buying a motorbike instead of a plot of land in his late teens – noting the two were ‘the same price’.

While others were more unhappy with the investments they had made, including a man who racked up $80,000 in HECS debt to become a teacher.

“I went to a private college that had astronomical fees that you didn’t really think about at the time,” he said.

“The teaching employment system is so messy that it took seven years of my career before I got a full-time job. It’s my 12th year as a teacher and I still have contracts with no prospect of permanent employment in sight.

RBA Governor Philip Lowe (pictured) is left with no other way to rein in cost of living pressures after the Australian government handed out more than a third of a trillion dollars in stimulus during the Covid pandemic in 2020 and 2021

RBA Governor Philip Lowe (pictured) is left with no other way to rein in cost of living pressures after the Australian government handed out more than a third of a trillion dollars in stimulus during the Covid pandemic in 2020 and 2021

Why do interest rates need to rise?

The most basic principle of economics is supply and demand.

When supply exceeds demand, prices fall, but when demand is high and supply is scarce, the cost of products increases.

This is why something rare and in demand like gold is expensive, while something plentiful like potatoes is relatively cheap.

This rule also applies to the money itself.

The Australian government’s huge stimulus during Covid totaling more than a third of a trillion dollars – in an era of record interest rates – has meant there’s more money competing for the same amount of goods and services.

The additional supply of liquidity is what is now driving prices higher (along with a range of other global factors, including the war in Ukraine and the supply chain chaos in the wake of the pandemic).

But by raising the cash rate and making money harder to borrow, it should limit the money supply and help lower prices.

Cold comfort for those who are forced to shell out more for their mortgage.

And others agreed that their HECS was “out of control.”

‘I feel that. So hard to see this amount waiting behind the scenes,” one woman said.

Others revealed their regret for not asking for a better salary.

“Letting someone pay me minimum wage for two years with no increase working over 100 hours a week capping at 40 hours because I needed the experience so badly, thinking that was the best way to go somewhere in my life,” a man complained.

“I was too scared that my boss would say no to me and hate me if I asked for more money, so I struggled for years,” one woman said.

Some regret “not asking for a discount” on expensive purchases.

“Dentistry doesn’t compare quotes and ‘required’ work and usually when I was younger I was too shy to ask for a discount or if she could give a discount,” one woman wrote on the post.

While others were shocked, asking for a discount at the dentist was possible.

“If so, I did it wrong all the time too,” said one woman.

Others regretted tying up their money in dead-end relationships.

“I loaned my ex $20,000 from my inheritance and will never see him again, but I was young and naive,” one woman says.

While others had to “repay joint loans” when the relationship did not work out.

“He was earning a lot and had bad credit. Promised to pay it in three instalments. He was then unfaithful and when we broke up he left me the loan to pay. I couldn’t afford it and paid double and a half with high interest,” said one woman.

Another woman said she regretted pulling out of an investment opportunity after feeling cold-blooded

Another woman said she regretted pulling out of an investment opportunity after feeling cold-blooded

‘Was there! Bought a car in my name, then stopped making payments and refused to sell the car! I had to take the car and sell it,” another added.

And some said they would have thought twice about getting a pet if they had known how expensive it could be.

“I had a dog, 12 months and $7,000 in vet bills later and all I can say is thank goodness for the pet insurance,” one person said.

Others have complained of wasting time looking for properties or postponing renovations that are “no longer affordable” with rising interest rates.

While dozens admitted they “didn’t take saving for a home seriously” until they were in their 25s or 30s.

It is the second time the Reserve Bank has raised the cash rate in 11 years – the first was in May when it topped the recor a low rate of 0.1% to curb the spiral of inflation.

How much could you pay on your loan in 2023?

How much extra would you be able to pay by Christmas?

$500,000: Monthly repayments will increase by $442

$600,000: Monthly repayments will increase by $532

$750,000: Monthly repayments will increase by $665

$1,000,000: Monthly repayments will increase by $885

The data is based on the Reserve Bank of Australia raising the cash rate to 1.75% by the end of 2022, in line with expectations.

How much extra could you pay by the end of 2023?

$500,000: Monthly repayments will increase by $652

$600,000: Monthly repayments will increase by $782

$750,000: Monthly repayments will increase by $977

$1,000,000: Monthly repayments will increase by $1303

Data based on the Reserve Bank of Australia raising the cash rate to 2.50% by the end of 2023, in line with expectations.

If banks fully pass on the biggest rate hike since 2000, the rate hike will add $133 a month on a loan worth $500,000 over 25 years and $265 a month on a loan worth of $1 million.

The big four financial institutions, including Commonwealth Bank, ANZ, Westpac and NAB, all raised interest rates in line with the RBA last month and are expected to do the same in a decision that will make matters worse the average homeowner by $2,000 per year. .

Further rapid increases in the rate of shooting are expected to follow every month at least until the end of the year, as Treasurer Jim Chalmers has admitted the cost of living crisis will get “tougher” for every Australian.

Economists had widely predicted the cash rate would rise 0.25 or 0.40%, with the shock move indicating inflation could be even worse than expected.

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Understanding the Mortgage Rates Associated with Buying a Condo https://regiofora.com/understanding-the-mortgage-rates-associated-with-buying-a-condo/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 20:08:09 +0000 https://regiofora.com/understanding-the-mortgage-rates-associated-with-buying-a-condo/ Buying a condominium is often the choice of people who value convenience. Getting this convenience means you may face additional challenges when it comes to qualifying for a mortgage. What is a condominium? Condominiums are individual units within a community living complex. They often look like apartments, but instead of renting, you own your private […]]]>

Buying a condominium is often the choice of people who value convenience. Getting this convenience means you may face additional challenges when it comes to qualifying for a mortgage.

What is a condominium?

Condominiums are individual units within a community living complex. They often look like apartments, but instead of renting, you own your private condominium. The resort’s common areas, such as the pools, lounges, tennis and basketball courts, are collectively owned by all resort residents through a Homeowners Association (HOA).


READ ALSO: 5 Most Expensive Cities in Arizona’s Real Estate Market


Condominiums are often popular in cities where land values ​​are high. They’re a great option for potential buyers who can’t afford a single-family home and for people looking to downsize later in life. Condominium complexes also offer amenities that may be difficult for an individual to afford on their own, such as swimming pools and regular maintenance.

Understanding Condominium Mortgage Rates

Mortgage interest rates for condominiums are generally higher than what the same individual would pay if buying a single family home with similar terms. Lenders view these mortgages as riskier than traditional single-family home mortgages.

Conventional mortgages

Most conventional mortgages will have a higher interest rate than a homebuyer would pay for a single family home because they are simply considered higher risk loans to take out.

FHA Loans

Prospective buyers seeking a Federal Housing Administration loan can put down a condominium down payment for as little as 3.5% and still pay the same rate as they would with a larger down payment. Unlike conventional loans, FHA loans charge an upfront mortgage insurance fee of 1.75% of the total loan amount. Some lenders may charge higher mortgage rates for condominiums, but the increases are usually small.

Association fees

When considering buying a condominium, be sure to consider the HOA fees associated with the purchase. All condominiums have HOAs. These associations are responsible for repairs and maintenance of the exteriors, grounds and common areas of the building. HOAs receive funding through dues paid by condominium owners each month in addition to their mortgage.

HOA dues can vary widely and depend on the amount of services they provide. Condominium owners will rarely find HOA dues less than $100 per month and should expect upwards of $500 per month for high-end properties. You may think of HOA fees as an additional tax for living in a condominium, but they can help you save money in a variety of ways. Since the association takes care of the maintenance of the grounds and exterior repairs, the co-owners do not have to worry about unforeseen expenses such as repairing a roof or the purchase and use of a Lawn mower. When looking at condominium complexes, beware of low HOA fees. This may be a sign that the resort is not charging enough to properly maintain the area, which will cause your condo to lose value over time.

Advantages and disadvantages

Condominiums may tend to appreciate at a slower rate than traditional single-family homes. With lower appreciation rates, this means condominiums can be more affordable than other housing options in the same area. Being the owner of a condominium allows you to benefit from tax deductions specific to the fact of being an owner.

When considering resorts, you’ll want to make sure the association has its affairs in order and that you understand its expectations. Many resorts have rules like quiet hours or no dogs of certain breeds. Others may dictate the length of your grass or the number of cars you can have in your driveway. HOA condos all apply different sets of guidelines and rules, so it’s up to you to do your research and make the best choice for your living situation.

Researching the ins and outs of buying a condominium will give you more confidence in your decision. Talk to a mortgage broker to find the best deal for your situation. Speak with condo associations and residents of the property. It’s best to find out about the issues before you buy and move in. You want to make sure you are buying the best property possible. Condominiums are no better or worse than other types of housing, but you need to make sure that this specific property is right for you.

Author: Deb Klein is Branch Manager at Reliability in Loans-PRMI Chandler and helping people realize their dream of home ownership since 2004. She specializes in the purchase and refinancing of primary and secondary residences (vacation or investment). Deb and her team have the expertise to streamline the loan process for a quick and efficient turnaround. She has been recognized by Phoenix Magazine as a Five Star Mortgage Professional for the past two years.

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Credit unions help Britons survive – but can they really compete with banks? | Borrowing & debt https://regiofora.com/credit-unions-help-britons-survive-but-can-they-really-compete-with-banks-borrowing-debt/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://regiofora.com/credit-unions-help-britons-survive-but-can-they-really-compete-with-banks-borrowing-debt/ Credit unions have proven to be a lifeline for many people during the pandemic and the cost of living crisis, and now they are allowed to offer a wider range of products. Zero-interest loans for people in financial vulnerability are being piloted and have so far helped borrowers pay for items ranging from school uniforms […]]]>

Credit unions have proven to be a lifeline for many people during the pandemic and the cost of living crisis, and now they are allowed to offer a wider range of products.

Zero-interest loans for people in financial vulnerability are being piloted and have so far helped borrowers pay for items ranging from school uniforms to essential furniture.

Meanwhile, more than a dozen credit unions have banded together to run a raffle savings account where someone wins £5,000 every month, in a bid to attract new customers to deposit money from them.

And the changes to the pipeline mean they will for the first time be able to offer products such as car financing to their members.

These moves could help make credit unions a serious alternative to UK banks and other big players. However, some people may be concerned that since January, five have gone out of business.

Credit unions are member-owned and controlled non-profit cooperatives that have traditionally specialized in loans and savings for the less well-off.

There are around 400 in the UK, and membership is based on a ‘common bond’, who may work in a particular industry or live in a certain area.

To find a credit union you may qualify for, go to findyourcreditunion.co.uk

Proponents say they play a unique role in providing an ethical home for people’s savings money and affordable loans to those who might otherwise be forced to turn to high-cost lenders or loan sharks.

In a speech last month (May), Treasury Economics Secretary John Glen paid tribute, saying that “time and time again the sector has lived its core values… putting people before profit and meet the challenges of our time.

In recent years, credit unions have increasingly targeted people of all incomes, and many have branched out into checking accounts, mortgages, and other products.

Despite support from many quarters, credit unions have remained relatively low profile in Britain. But membership is on the rise: the number of adults in the UK has reached 1.92 million, a new record, according to the latest data from the Bank of England. However, the number of “young filers” (i.e. children and young people) has been steadily declining for some time and now stands at 212,000.

In England, Scotland and Wales, the amount of interest credit unions can charge on their loans is capped at 3% per month on the declining balance, or 42.6% per annum APR (the cap is higher). low in Northern Ireland). This means that they can sometimes offer a very good deal for those borrowing small amounts over shorter periods.

However, many people who have essential borrowing needs, such as meeting unexpected expenses, cannot access or afford existing forms of credit. Some could afford to repay a loan over time, but not the often high interest levels that can be involved.

As a result, the government provided Fair4All Finance – a non-profit organization set up in 2019 – with £3.8 million in funding to pilot an “interest-free loan scheme” for people in this situation.

The first phase of the pilot is now underway. Since January, the South Manchester Credit Union has been offering interest-free loans of between £100 and £2,000.

Customers may be eligible in situations where they are denied a standard interest-bearing loan for affordability reasons, but the removal of interest makes the loan affordable. Or they may have been barred from accessing credit but their circumstances have changed, meaning their credit score shouldn’t be a barrier to lending.

“So far, the average loan value has been £490, with reasons for loans ranging from payment for driving lessons and initial childcare costs to enable customers to return to work, to funds for housing and to purchase school uniforms, essential furniture and white goods,” says Fair4All Finance.

The average loan term is 12 months, but the South Manchester Credit Union says it can go up to a maximum of 24 months for larger loans. Most of the applicants had poor or very poor credit ratings, but to date 94% of refunds had been honoured, he adds.

Officially, the South Manchester Credit Union’s interest-free loan pilot is over, but “we’re still doing it,” says Sheenagh Young, its chief executive. “We called it the Stepping Stone loan.”

Among those who removed one was Zainab, 43, a mother of three who had moved into a new home after domestic abuse. The property was largely unfurnished and she needed a loan to buy carpets, beds and bedding. Her credit rating has been damaged by recent utility company defaults related to her running away from her former home. Her income was also limited, but the credit union was able to offer her a £300 interest-free loan to have carpets installed and referred her to local organizations to help with the beds.

A wider pilot rollout is expected to begin later this year.

A separate program to test a raffle savings account called PrizeSaver was run between late 2019 and early 2021. It proved successful, and 16 credit unions across the UK – including South Manchester, London Capital, Clockwise and Plane Saver – continue to operate. PrizeSaver.

With this, every €1 in your PrizeSaver account at the end of the month gives you automatic entry into the following month’s draw. You get a maximum of 200 entries per month, even if you have over £200 in savings. Each month, one person in one of the 16 credit unions earns £5,000, 10 savers earn £50 and 10 earns £20.

The upcoming Financial Services and Markets Bill is expected to include a provision allowing credit unions to offer hire-purchase and conditional sale (similar to hire-purchase) agreements to their members. This means that, like their American counterparts, they would be able to offer products such as auto financing.

Five credit unions have gone bankrupt since January, although some in the industry say those that go out of business often tend to be small, with a few hundred active members. Credit unions are covered by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme, which protects savings up to £85,000.

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Here’s 1 Housing Market Stock That’s Great Long-Term Value https://regiofora.com/heres-1-housing-market-stock-thats-great-long-term-value/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 15:51:49 +0000 https://regiofora.com/heres-1-housing-market-stock-thats-great-long-term-value/ Market sell-offs are no fun for long-term investors, but they are necessary for healthy markets – and they can provide investors with opportunities to invest in stellar companies at excellent prices. One such company is the multi-family housing lender Walker and Dunlop (WD 1.95%)whose shares are down 28% since the start of the year. Walker […]]]>

Market sell-offs are no fun for long-term investors, but they are necessary for healthy markets – and they can provide investors with opportunities to invest in stellar companies at excellent prices.

One such company is the multi-family housing lender Walker and Dunlop (WD 1.95%)whose shares are down 28% since the start of the year. Walker & Dunlop has proven itself with exceptional growth over the past decade, and its recent moves could set it up for another decade of success.

Image source: Getty Images.

Walker & Dunlop is a leading multi-family housing lender

Walker & Dunlop finance apartment buildings and multi-unit houses. It’s one of the best in the game, and last year was the largest lender of its kind in the United States when it comes to loans funded by Fannie Mae.

A graph shows the largest multi-family lenders in the United States

Image source: Statista.

Walker & Dunlop stands out for its impressive growth in the multifamily lending space. He focused on scaling the business in the early 2010s, and by 2020 he had diversified the business to generate multiple streams of income.

Walker & Dunlop grew the total dollar amount of financing it provided for multifamily and other home loans — its transaction volume — at an impressive compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 32% over the past decade. . This fueled revenue and net income growth from 2011 to 2021, with revenue growing at a CAGR of 24% and diluted earnings per share (EPS) growing at a CAGR of 18%.

Tailwinds could help it gain market share

Walker & Dunlop released another excellent quarterly earnings report in the first quarter, with total trading volume up 40% from the first quarter to $12.7 billion. Its revenue increased 42% from a year ago to $319 million, while diluted EPS increased 18%.

Most loans in the multifamily space tend to be shorter terms of up to 10 years, with a lump sum payment at the end of the loan. Rather than pay this lump sum, most borrowers choose to refinance their loan at the end of the term. Walker & Dunlop management highlighted the tailwinds for the business in the years to come, as the company calls it a “wave of deadlines”. There will be hundreds of billions of dollars in multi-family loans maturing in the next five years, which Walker & Dunlop seeks to fund and grow its market share.

A graph shows loans maturing in the multifamily space over the next ten years.

Image source: Walker & Dunlop.

However, Walker & Dunlop is not sitting around waiting for this wave of deadlines. The company has spent a significant amount of cash on acquiring businesses to fuel the next phase of growth. The company bought Alliant Capital for nearly $700 million at the end of 2021, one of the largest acquisitions in its history. The deal gives Walker & Dunlop, already the fifth-largest affordable housing lender in the United States, an even stronger presence in this sector, which should help it reach its goal of generating $60 billion in loans. affordable housing over the next five years. He also expects Alliant to be an immediate positive contributor, adding $90-100 million in annual revenue while adding $0.45-0.60 in diluted EPS.

A cheap price for the fast growing business

Walker & Dunlop is a well run lender that has done an excellent job of growing its business. Under CEO Willy Walker, the company has generated outstanding returns of 896% over the past decade, beating the 280% return of the S&P 500 during the same time.

However, the stock was beaten with the wider market, and it fell almost 29%. year to date. After seeing its price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio peak at 18.7 last year, Walker & Dunlop now trades at 12.5 times earnings.

Although this is on par with its 10-year average P/E, the stock has recorded excellent growth and is well positioned to continue to gain market share. As long as Walker & Dunlop continues to execute on its vision, it should be a solid stock to buy and hold for the next decade.

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